Listening in preparation for week 11

Thew following tracks are worth familiarising yourself with after the final lecture of this term:

Prokofiev, Lieutenant Kijé Symphonic Suite: The Birth of Kijé

  • click here to access this via Spotify
  • click here to access this via Youtube

Prokofiev, Romeo and Juliet Ballet Op. 64 The fight (form Act I)

  • click here to access this via Spotify
  • click here to access this via Youtube

Prokofiev, Violin Concerto No. 2 Op. 62

  • first movement: click here to access via Spotify
  • second movement: click here to access via Spotify
  • third movement: click here to access via Spotify
  • Click here for score

 

Listening in preparation for week 7

Ivan Dzerzhinsky, ‘От края и до края’ [From region  to region], a Chorus from the Opera Тихий Дон [Quiet flows the Don] (1935), sung by the Bol’shoy Theatre Chorus

  • click here to access this via Youtube

Sergey Prokofiev, October (Cantata) Op. 74 (1936-7)

  • click here to access this via Youtube
  • click here to access this via Spotify

Dmitri Shostakovich, Symphony Number 5 Op. 47 (1937)

  • click here to access this via Spotify
  • click here to access this via Youtube (with score)

Nikolai Myaskovsky, Symphony No 12 (Collective Farm Symphony) OP. 35 (1932)

  • click here for first movement via Spotify
  • click here for second movement via Spotify
  • click here for third (final) movement via Spotify

Listening in preparation for week 5

Vadim Kozin, ‘Druzhba’ (1938)

  • click here to access this via Spotify
  • Click here to access this via Youtube

Leonid Utesov, ‘Suliko’ (1933)

  • click here to access this via Spotify
  • no Youtube link, but see here for other recordings by same singer

Alla Bayanova, ‘Ochen’ khorosho’ (1930s?)

  • click here to listen to this via Spotify
  • no Youtube link, but click here to listen to other recordings by same singer
  • See also here

See also here

Listening in preparation for week 4

‘Svabenaia’, performed by the Jewish vocal ensemble of the Belorussian SSR [Evokans], Shalom Comrade: Yiddish Music in the Soviet Union 1928-1961 (Schott Wergo SM 1627-2)

  • Click here to listen to this via Spotify
  • no Youtube link

‘The wind from the field’, performed by the Ukrainian Male Chorus, Folk Songs of the Soviet Union (Eden Creek 2013)

  • Click here to listen to this via Spotify
  • no Youtube link

‘Balalaika tunes’, Pianitsky Chorus, Folk Songs of the Soviet Union (Eden Creek 2013)

  • Click here to listen to this via Spotify
  • Click here to listen to a version of this via Youtube

Lithuanian Lullaby, sung by Veronika Pvolioniene, Musics of the Soviet Union (Smithsonian, Folkways CD SF 40002, 1989)

  • Click here to listen to this via Spotify
  • Click here to access this via Youtube

‘Kele kele’, performed by the Armenian State Dance and Song Ensemble, Armenian Folk Music in the USSR (Smithsonian, Folkways, 1960)

  • Click here to listen to this via Spotify
  • Click here to access this via Youtube

 

 

Listening in preparation for week 3

Aleksandr Mosolov: 2 Preludes, Op. 15 (1925-6)

  • click here to listen to this via Spotify (first prelude)
  • click here to listen to this via Spotify (second prelude)
  • click here to listen to both preludes via Youtube (score presentation)
  • click here to access the score

Nikolai Rolavets, String Quartet No. 3 (1920)

  • click here to access this via Spotify
  • click here to access score

Gavril Popov, Sympohony No. 1 (1935)

  • click here to access this via Youtube
  • no score

 

Listening in preparation for week 2

Alexander Skryabin, “Towards the flame” Op.72 (1914).

  • Click here to listen to this via Spotify
  • Click here to listen to this via Youtube
  • access score here

Alexander Skryabin, Symphony no 4, Poem of Ecstasy, Op. 54 (written between 1905 and 1908).

  • Click here to listen to this via spotify.
  • Click here to listen to this via Youtube
  • access score here

Nikolai Medtner, Piano Concerto No. 1 in C minor, Op. 33, Movt. I (1914–18).

  • Click here to listen to this via Spotify.
  • Click here to listen to this via Youtube
  • access score here

Sergei Rachmaninoff, Etudes tableux, No. 1 in F-sharp minor Op.33 (1911).

  • Click here to listen to this via Spotify.
  • Click here to listen to this via Youtube
  • access score here

Listening in preparation for week 1

Please try to listen to as many of the following items as you are able. This is a short overview list and is designed to give you a fast of the kinds of materials we will be looking at on this module.

‘Polyushko, polye’, sung by the Red Army Choir, music by Lev Knipper, with lyrics by Viktor Gusev in 1933

  • Click here to hear this on Spotify
  • Click here to listen to this on Youtube

Lev Knipper, Symphony No. 4 ”Poem of the Komsomol Fighter” in D Major, Op. 41, I. Andante maestoso – Allegro

  • Click here to hear this on Youtube

Vadim Kozin, ‘Druzhba’, available on Russian Light Songs Volume 1 (Black Round Records, 2010)

  • Click here to hear this on Spotify
  • Click here to hear this on Youtube

Dmitri Shostakovich, Symphony No. 7 “The Leningrad”, Op. 60, I. Allegretto [

  • Click here to hear this on Spotify
  • Click here to listen to this on Youtube

Sergei Prokofiev, Violin Concerto No. 2, Op. 63, II. Andante

  • Click here to hear this on Spotify
  • Click here to listen to this on Youtube

Pokrovskiy Ensemble, ‘Porushka’, The Wild Field (Real World Records 1991)

  • Link here to hear this on Spotify
  • Click here to listen to this on Youtube

Aleksandr Mosolov, ‘Factory: machine-music’ [also known as ‘The Iron Foundry’] from the ballet Stal, Op. 19 (1926-7)

  • Click here to hear this on Spotify
  • Click here to listen to this on Youtube

8 Tracks that Defined the Soviet Era’s Industrial Scene

[From Electronic Beats blog]

The Moscow-based techno-punk outfit Interchain (comprised of Andrew Lee and Jenya Gorbunov, pictured above) already has an impressive discography. But their most recent release, Plenum—which just came out on the Hivern Discs sublabel HVNX this past March—is a particularly fiery addition to their original take on frenetic, punk rock-indebted electronic sounds. They sat down with us to shed some insight onto their wide range of influences from the Soviet era’s industrial music scene. Listen to their eight selections—from the ’20s to the ’90s—below.

Arseny Avraamov, “Symphony Of Factory Sirens” (Public Event, Baku 1922)

Click here to read and hear more